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Year 12 Course Guide Introduction

ATAR

Applied Information Technology

ATAR Course ATAIT

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEAIT.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two parts which are delivered as a pair.

This course examines the development and application of digital technologies and how it impacts on most aspects of living and working in our society. Digital technologies have changed how people interact and exchange information. These developments have created new challenges and opportunities in lifestyle, entertainment, education and commerce.

Throughout the Applied Information
Technology ATAR course, students investigate client-driven issues and challenges, devise solutions, produce models or prototypes and then evaluate and refine the design solution in collaboration with the client. Students are provided with the opportunity to experience, albeit in a school environment, developing digital solutions for real situations.

The practical application of skills, techniques and strategies to solve information problems is a key focus of the course. Students also gain an understanding of computer systems and networks. In undertaking projects and designing solutions the legal, ethical and social issues associated with each solution are also considered and evaluated. The context of the subject is the ‘Internet of things’, and the how and why of how design and internationally created technical standards are combined together to create new and ever emerging converged technologies, such as the iPad and smart devices.

The Applied Information Technology ATAR course provides a sound theoretical and practical foundation, offering pathways to further studies and a wide range of technology based careers.

Students selecting this course cannot select GTAIT.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Biology

ATAR Course ATBLY

Prerequisites: Grade C in AEBLY or equivalent Year 11 Science course.

The Biology ATAR course has three interrelated strands: Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding which build on students’ learning in the Year 7–10 Science curriculum. The three strands of the Biology ATAR course will be taught in an integrated way.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. It is recommended that students studying units 3 and 4 have completed units 1 and 2.

Unit 3 – Continuity of species
In this unit, students investigate biotechnology mechanisms of heredity and the ways in which inheritance patterns can be explained, modelled and predicted and apply the theory of evolution by natural selection in order to examine changes in populations.

Unit 4 – Surviving in a changing environment
In this unit, students investigate system change and continuity in response to changing external conditions and pathogens; they investigate homeostasis and the transmission and impact of infectious disease; and they consider the factors that encourage or reduce the spread of infectious disease at the population level.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

 

Chemistry

ATAR Course ATCHE

Prerequisites: Grade C in AECHE.

The Chemistry course has three interrelated strands: Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding which build on students’ learning in the Year 7–10 Science curriculum. The three strands of the Chemistry course are taught in an integrated way.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. It is essential that students studying units 3 and 4 have completed units 1 and 2. Students are expected to know the content and skills from the Year 11 course.

Unit 3 – Equilibrium, acids and bases, and redox reactions
In this unit, students investigate the concept of reversibility of reactions and the dynamic nature of equilibrium in chemical systems; contemporary models of acid-base behaviour that explain their properties and uses; and the principles of oxidation and reduction reactions, including the generation of electricity from electrochemical cells.

Unit 4 – Organic chemistry and chemical synthesis
In this unit, students develop their understanding of the relationship between the structure, properties and chemical reactions of different organic functional groups. Students also investigate the process of chemical synthesis to form useful substances and products and the need to consider a range of factors in the design of these processes.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Dance (Gifted and Talented)

ATAR Course ATDANS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing.

Dance encourages artistic creativity and the active use of the imagination. This course focuses on the interrelationship between the practical and theoretical aspect of dance. Students engage in the making and performing of movement and develop a keen appreciation of its meaning through the analysis of dance works and dance in context.

Dance ideas are presented through a variety of forms and through critical decision making students explore how movement is manipulated and refined to reflect choreographic intent.

Students experience enjoyment and personal achievement through expressing and challenging themselves physically. ATAR dance offers students the opportunity to perform at a high level. Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.

Through participation in Dance ATAR course, students also develop transferable skills essential to their future such as communication, collaborative teamwork, negotiation, conflict resolution and problem solving as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate.

Dance is a dynamic course that has the potential to shape and support powerful 21st century thinkers.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Design: Photography

ATAR Course ATDES

Prerequisites: Entry into ATAR English

The Year 12 Design involves the strategic development, planning and production of visual and tactile communication. Student refine their skills to assess, analyse and communicate ideas, values, beliefs, attitudes, messages and information for specific purpose and intentions.

Students study commercial and influential design which develops awareness that design is influenced by various stakeholders to produce products, services and brands that communicate ideas, messages, information and values, often to influence opinion and attitudes. Commercial design is client and market driven and reflect contemporary consumers demands. Students will examine commercial and manufacturing requirements for a real world solution, with relevant production skills and processes, materials and technologies. Within Influential Design students produce products and visual layouts for specific and applied contexts with an understanding of applied semiotics and the construction of meaning: They analyse the audience in terms of empathy, profiling and stereotyping, and develop persuasive solutions using research, testing and feedback mechanisms. Design ATAR has direct industry applications to the world of advertising, marketing and e-commerce and reflects the importance of design in the growth of digital/social media as a career choice.

Using photography and graphic design students have the opportunity to explore and create book, magazine or video game covers or designs; creative or persuasive advertising campaigns, small business identity design or branding , fashion, reportage, landscape, narrative, architectural, portrait ,photography, anti-advertisements; promotional materials or re-branding for services; organisations and non-profit organisations;political initiatives or social issue awareness, world issues created by first world consumers; gender politics;mental health issues; health related; counter culture; music promotions ; seasonal calendars or greeting cards for a specific target audience; Arts promotional posters or visual communication for product cartons, for example, milk shakes, juice, soups; logos, labels.

Students choosing this course cannot select DESIGN: PHOTOGRAPHY GENERAL (GTDESP).

This course counts towards a students WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Drama (Gifted And Talented)

ATAR Course ATDRAS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

The Drama ATAR course focuses on drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes, such as improvisation and text interpretation which allows them to create drama and interpret a range of texts, written or devised by others. Their work in this course includes production and design aspects, such as sets, costumes, props, sound and lighting. Increasingly, students use technologies, such as digital sound and multimedia. They present drama to a range of audiences and work in different performance settings.

Students work independently and collaboratively, learning self-management skills, showing initiative and demonstrating leadership and interpersonal skills. The Drama ATAR course requires them to develop and practice problem-solving skills through creative and analytical thinking processes. They develop their capacity to respond to, reflect on, and make informed judgments using appropriate terminology and language to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate drama.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units, which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
This unit focuses on the realisation of drama text, context, forms and styles through the application of selected approaches.

Unit 4
This unit focuses on the approaches to and interpretations of drama text, context, forms and styles through the application of selected approaches.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

English

ATAR Course ATENG

Prerequisites: Grade C in AEENG or entry from AELIT.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
Students explore representations of themes, issues, ideas and concepts through a comparison of texts. They analyse and compare the relationships between language, genre and contexts, comparing texts within and/or across different genres and modes. Students recognise and analyse the conventions of genre in texts and consider how those conventions may assist interpretation. Students compare and evaluate the effect of different media, forms and modes on the structure of texts and how audiences respond to them. Understanding of these concepts is demonstrated through the creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.

Unit 4
Students examine different interpretations and perspectives to develop further their knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. They challenge perspectives, values and attitudes in texts, developing and testing their own interpretations through debate and argument. Through close study of texts, students explore relationships between content and structure, voice and perspectives and the text and context. This provides the opportunity for students to extend their experience of language and of texts and explore their ideas through their own reading and viewing. Students demonstrate understanding of the texts studied through creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.

Student choosing this course cannot select: English General (GTENG).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Geography

ATAR COURSE ATGEO
Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEGEO. 
The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.
Unit 3 – Global environmental change
This unit focuses on the changing biophysical cover of the Earth’s surface, the creation of anthropogenic biomes and the resulting impacts on either global climate or biodiversity. Land cover transformations have changed both global climate and biodiversity through their interaction with atmospheric and ecological systems. Conversely, climate change and loss of biodiversity are producing further transformations in land cover. Through applying the concept of sustainability, students are given the opportunity to examine and evaluate a program designed to address the negative effect of land cover change. Aspects of physical, environmental and human geography provide students with an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the processes related to land cover change, their local, regional and global environmental consequences, and possible sustainable solutions.
This unit begins with an overview of land cover change drawn from different regions and countries. Two depth studies provide greater detail. The first study focuses on the interrelationship between land cover and either global climate change or biodiversity loss. The second study focuses on the evaluation of a local land cover change initiative designed to address either climate change or biodiversity loss.
Unit 4 – Planning sustainable places Challenges exist in designing urban places to render them more productive, vibrant and sustainable. How people respond to these challenges, individually and collectively, will influence the sustainability and livability of places into the future. While all places are subject to changes produced by economic, demographic, social, political and environmental processes, the outcomes of these processes vary depending on local responses, adaptations and planning practices. Students examine how governments, planners, communities, interest groups and individuals attempt to address these challenges in order to ensure that places are sustainable. They also investigate the ways in which geographical knowledge and skills can be applied to identify and address these challenges. The present and future needs of society are addressed by the allocation and reallocation of land uses, improving infrastructure and transport systems and enhancing amenities to meet the needs of the population as perceived by the different perspectives of the various stakeholders.
The unit begins with a global scale overview of the process of urbanisation and its consequences. Urbanisation not only affect human wellbeing and the rate of world population growth, it has created a range of challenges for urban, rural and remote places, including Indigenous communities. The interconnected challenges faced in places, and other matters related to livability, are a focus of this unit. Two depth studies provide greater detail. The first study focuses on challenges in metropolitan Perth or a regional urban centre in
Western Australia. The second study focuses on challenges faced in a megacity. Students examine the concepts, processes and roles of planning in these selected contexts. This approach enables students to also develop an understanding of the challenges in two urban places.
This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Human Biology

ATAR COURSE ATHBY

Prerequisites: Grade C in AEHBY or equivalent Year 11 Science course.

The Human Biology ATAR course has three interrelated strands: Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding which build on students’ learning in the Year 7-10 Science Curriculum. The three strands of the Human Biology course will be taught in an integrated way.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. It is recommended that students studying units 3 and 4 have completed units 1 and 2.

Unit 3 – Homeostasis and disease
This unit explores the nervous and endocrine systems and the mechanisms that help maintain the systems of the body to function within normal range, and the body’s immune responses to invading pathogens.

Unit 4 – Human variation and evolution
This unit explores the variations in humans, their changing environment and evolutionary trends in hominids.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Italian Second Language

ATAR Course ATISL

Prerequisites: Grade C in AEISL.

The Italian ATAR Course has three learning contexts: The individual; the Italian-speaking communities and; the changing world. Throughout the course students will engage with text types and textual conversations, linguistic resources, intercultural understandings,
language learning and communication strategies. This course will prove to be valuable for tertiary studies in European languages, international relations, history, art, linguistics and philosophy. it also lends itself to industries including but not limited to: travel; hospitality; publishing; theatre; commerce; international
banking; journalism; communications; medicine; music and art.

This Year 12 ATAR syllabus is divided into two units, which will form topics for written, oral and aural interactions.

Unit 3– Grazie Italia (Thank you Italy)
In this unit, students reflect on the place of all things Italian in their lives and in their community, explore the lifestyle, interests and actives in everyday life of Italians and consider II Made in Italy as a global brand and explore the contributions of Italians.

Unit 4-Ieri, oggi e domani (Yesterday, today and tomorrow)

In this unit, students reflect on their final year at school and their plans for the future, explore employment and other issues for Italian youth and consider current global environmental issues in relation to climate change that are relevant to them.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There are two COMPULSORY external examinations.

Literature

ATAR Course ATLIT

Prerequisites: Grade A in Year 11 English.

Unit 3
Unit 3 develops students’ knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity in literary texts. Students inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined. Throughout the unit, students create analytical responses that are characterised by a confident, engaging style and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with language, adapt forms and challenge conventions and ideas.

Unit 4
Unit 4 develops students’ appreciation of the significance of literary study through close critical analysis of literary texts drawn from a range of forms, genres and styles. Students reflect upon the creative use of language, and the structural and stylistic features that shape meaning and influence response. The unit focuses on the dynamic nature of literary interpretation and considers the insights texts offer, their use of literary conventions and aesthetic appeal. Analytical responses demonstrate increasing independence in interpreting texts and synthesising a range of perspectives into critical and imaginative responses. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with literary conventions and reflect on how the created text takes into account the expectations of audiences.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Mathematics: Applications

ATAR Course ATMAA

Prerequisites: At least 60% in AEMAA or teacher recommendation.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
This unit has three topics: ‘Bivariate data analysis’, ‘Growth and decay in sequences’, and ‘Graphs and networks’. ‘Bivariate data analysis’ introduces students to some methods for identifying, analysing and describing associations between pairs of variables, including the use of the least-squares method as a tool for modelling and analysing linear associations. The content is to be taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process. ‘Growth and decay in sequences’ employs recursion to generate sequences that can be used to model and investigate patterns of growth and decay in discrete situations. These sequences find application in a wide range of practical situations, including modelling the growth of a compound interest investment, the growth of a bacterial population, or the decrease in the value of a car over time. ‘Graphs and networks’ introduces students to the language of graphs and the ways in which graphs, represented as a collection of points and interconnecting lines, can be used to model and analyse everyday situations, such as a rail or social network.

Unit 4
This unit has three topics: ‘time series analysis’, ‘loans, investments and annuities’, and ‘networks and decision mathematics’. ‘Time series analysis’ continues students’ study of statistics by introducing them to the concepts and techniques of time series analysis. The content is to be taught within the framework of the statistical investigation process. ‘Loans investments and annuities’ aims to provide students with sufficient knowledge of financial mathematics to solve practical problems associated with taking out or refinance a mortgage and making investments. ‘Networks and decision mathematics’ uses networks to model and aid decision making in practical situations.

Students choosing this subject cannot select: Mathematics Methods ( ATMAM) or Mathematics (ATMAS).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Mathematics: Methods

ATAR Course ATMAM

Prerequisites: At least 60% in AEMAM or teacher recommendation.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
The study of calculus continues with the derivatives of exponential and trigonometric functions and their applications, together with some differentiation techniques and applications to optimisation problems and graph sketching. It concludes with integration, both as a process that reverses differentiation and as a way of calculating areas. The fundamental theorem of calculus as a link between differentiation and integration is emphasised. In statistics, discrete random variables are introduced, together with their uses in modelling random processes involving chance and variation. This supports the development of a framework for statistical inference.

Unit 4
The calculus in this unit deals with derivatives of logarithmic functions. In probability and statistics, continuous random variables and their applications are introduced and the normal distribution is used in a variety of contexts. The study of statistical inference in this unit is the culmination of earlier work on probability and random variables. Statistical inference is one of the most important parts of statistics, in which the goal is to estimate an unknown parameter associated with a population using a sample of data drawn from that population. In the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, statistical inference is restricted to estimating proportions in two-outcome populations.

Students choosing this subject cannot select: Mathematics Applications (ATMAA).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Mathematics: Specialist

ATAR Course ATMAS

Prerequisites: At least 55% in AEMAS or teacher recommendation.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
Unit 3 of the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course contains three topics: Complex numbers,Functions and sketching graphs and Vectors in three dimensions. The study of vectors was introduced in Unit 1 with a focus on vectors in two-dimensional space. In this unit, three dimensional vectors are studied and vector equations and vector calculus are introduced, with the latter extending students’ knowledge of calculus from the Mathematics Methods ATAR course. Cartesian and vector equations,together with equations of planes, enables students to solve geometric problems and to solve problems involving motion in three dimensional space. The Cartesian form of complex numbers was introduced in Unit 2, and the study of complex numbers is now extended to the polar form. The study of functions and techniques of graph sketching, begun in the Mathematics Methods ATAR course, is extended and applied in sketching graphs and solving problems involving integration.

Unit 4
Unit 4 of the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course contains three topics: Integration and applications of integration, Rates of change and differential equations and Statistical inference. In Unit 4, the study of differentiation and integration of functions continues, and the calculus techniques developed in this and previous topics are applied to simple differential equations, in particular in biology and kinematics. These topics demonstrate the real-world applications of the mathematics learned throughout the Mathematics Specialist ATAR course. In this unit, all of the students’ previous experience working with probability and statistics is drawn together in the study of statistical inference for the distribution of sample means and confidence intervals for sample means.

Students choosing this subject cannot select: Mathematics Applications (ATMAA).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

 

Media Production and Analysis

ATAR COURSE ATMPA

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEMPA.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Media Art
This unit provides the opportunity for students to explore a range of media art forms experimenting in non-traditional narrative structures and extending their understanding of aesthetics. Students analyse, view, listen to and interact with contemporary and traditional examples of media art, identifying techniques, themes, meanings that are created and audience interpretation. They consider the representation of values and technological developments that influence perceptions of art within media work. Students are encouraged to experiment with technologies, structure, codes and conventions to express their ideas and creativity. They have the opportunity to extend their production skills and processes and the emergence of personal style.

Unit 4 – Power and persuasion
The focus for this unit is power and persuasion includes the seductive nature of popular media forms to propaganda and political persuasion. Through this broad focus students extend their understanding of persuasive media, examining the way the media is able to reflect, challenge and shape values and attitudes. They critically analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of media work, considering the purposes and values of producers and audiences. Students synthesise a range of ideas, skills and processes to create their own media productions that express their views.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and exhibitions.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Media Production and Analysis (Gifted And Talented)

ATAR Course ATMPAS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Media Art
This unit provides the opportunity for students to explore a range of media art forms experimenting in non-traditional narrative structures and extending their understanding of aesthetics. Students analyse, view, listen to and interact with contemporary and traditional examples of media art, identifying techniques, themes, meanings that are created and audience interpretation. They consider the representation of values and technological developments that influence perceptions of art withing media work. Students are encourages to experiment with technologies, structure, codes and conventions to express their ideas and creativity. They have the opportunity to extend their production skills and processes and the emergence of personal style.

Unit 4 – Power and Persuasion
The focus for this unit is power and persuasion includes the seductive nature of popular media forms to propaganda and political persuasion. Through this broad focus students extend their understanding of persuasive media, examining the way the media is able to reflect, challenge and shape values and attitudes. They critically analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of media work, considering the purposes and values of producers and audiences. Students synthesis a range of ideas, skills and processes to create their own media productions that express their views.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and exhibitions.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and an ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Music

ATAR COURSE ATMUS

 

Prerequisites: Completion of AEMUSS course

 

Students continue to engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They develop their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. All students study works representing Western Art, Contemporary and Jazz genres and develop skills applicable to each.

 

Semester 1:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Identities. What can music tell us about people? Through the journey of critically considering how music can be used as a powerful form of expression, students explore the potential for music to communicate identity. Students analyse and understand ways in which the elements and characteristics of music can be applied to express:

  • personal identity – developing and expressing the artist’s own personal and/or musical identity
  • socio-political identity – a vehicle to express societal and political views and values
  • cultural identity – reflecting the shared characteristics of a group of people in a given place and time.

 

Semester 2:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Innovations. What drives a composer to create something truly different? Innovation within music is a result of ideas driven by personal experience, and socio-political and cultural influences. Students analyse and understand music that demonstrates innovative use of music elements and concepts, responding to how this challenged, further developed or reimagined music traditions to create new ideas, and communicate new meanings.

 

Students are required to participate in a minimum of one ensemble.

 

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Music: Gifted and Talented

ATAR COURSE ATMUSS

 

Prerequisites: Completion of AEMUSS course

 

Students continue to engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They develop their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. All students study works representing Western Art, Contemporary and Jazz genres and develop skills applicable to each.

 

Semester 1:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Identities. What can music tell us about people? Through the journey of critically considering how music can be used as a powerful form of expression, students explore the potential for music to communicate identity. Students analyse and understand ways in which the elements and characteristics of music can be applied to express:

  • personal identity – developing and expressing the artist’s own personal and/or musical identity
  • socio-political identity – a vehicle to express societal and political views and values
  • cultural identity – reflecting the shared characteristics of a group of people in a given place and time.

 

Semester 2:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Innovations. What drives a composer to create something truly different? Innovation within music is a result of ideas driven by personal experience, and socio-political and cultural influences. Students analyse and understand music that demonstrates innovative use of music elements and concepts, responding to how this challenged, further developed or reimagined music traditions to create new ideas, and communicate new meanings.

 

Students are required to participate in a minimum of one ensemble.

 

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Music: Music Theatre (Gifted and Talented)

ATAR COURSE ATMUST

 

Prerequisites: Completion of AEMUST course

 

Students continue to engage in music making as performers and/or composers, both individually and collaboratively. They develop their music literacy, learning how the elements and characteristics of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when performing, composing, listening to and analysing music. All students study works representing Western Art, Contemporary and Jazz genres and develop skills applicable to each.

 

Semester 1:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Identities. What can music tell us about people? Through the journey of critically considering how music can be used as a powerful form of expression, students explore the potential for music to communicate identity. Students analyse and understand ways in which the elements and characteristics of music can be applied to express:

  • personal identity – developing and expressing the artist’s own personal and/or musical identity
  • socio-political identity – a vehicle to express societal and political views and values
  • cultural identity – reflecting the shared characteristics of a group of people in a given place and time.

Semester 2:

 

The music analysis theme for this unit is Innovations. What drives a composer to create something truly different? Innovation within music is a result of ideas driven by personal experience, and socio-political and cultural influences. Students analyse and understand music that demonstrates innovative use of music elements and concepts, responding to how this challenged, further developed or reimagined music traditions to create new ideas, and communicate new meanings.

 

Students are required to participate in senior Music Theatre productions.

 

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Modern History

ATAR COURSE ATHIM

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in
AEHIM or acceptance into ATENG or TLIT.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3-Modern nations in the 20th century

Elective 3: China 1935–1989 (the Long March to the Tiananmen Massacre)
This unit examines the characteristics of modern nations in the 20th century; the crises that confronted nations, their responses to these crises and the different paths nations have taken to fulfill their goals. Students study the characteristics of one nation. Students investigate crises that challenged the stability of government, the path of development that was taken and the social, economic and political order that was either established or maintained. Students examine the ways in which the nation dealt with internal divisions and external threats. They emerge with a deeper understanding of the character of a modern nation.

Unit 4 – The modern world since 1945

Elective 1: The Changing European World Since 1945
This unit examines some significant and distinctive features of the modern world within the period 1945–2001 in order to build students’ understanding of the contemporary world. These include changes to the nature of the world order: shifting international tensions, alliances and power blocs. Students study the development and key events of the Cold War, the collapse of Communism and the development of the European Union in the late 20th century.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Philosophy And Ethics

ATAR COURSE ATPAE

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEPAE

Philosophical thought shapes what people think, what they value, what they consider to be true and how they engage with others and the world around them. It is one of the foundations of all academic disciplines. It seeks to shed light on questions such as: What is real? What and how do we understand? How should we live? What is it to be human? and Who am I? It deals with issues and problems that cannot be addressed adequately by appealing to experience and experiment alone. Philosophical inquiry requires that we question our assumptions, beliefs and our reasons for holding them. The Philosophy and Ethics ATAR course aims to empower students to make independent judgments on the basis of reason.

Philosophy has practical applications. We apply philosophy when we seek to define something, when we challenge assumptions, when we construct an argument, and when we think about what we are doing, how are we doing it and to what ends. The study of philosophy gives us a set of skills that better enables us to understand, evaluate and engage with our world, whether that is our personal or our social world, our world of work or the wider question of how the world works.

In Philosophy and Ethics, disagreement is common. Methods of inquiry and the skill of critical reasoning help us deal more effectively with disagreement. This course places considerable emphasis on students contributing constructively to a philosophical Community of Inquiry.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3- Reason and society
The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. Students examine the mapping of arguments; humanism, religion and values; individualism and social identity; the ideals of a good society; and the ideals of politics and government.

Unit 4- Reason and meaning
Students examine complex arguments; a number of higher-order systems of inquiry; ways of understanding the relationship between religion and science ; and ethical issues of life and death.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:

  • Philosophy and Ethics General (GTPAE)

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

 

Physical Education Studies

ATAR Course ATPES

Prerequisites: Grade C AEPES

Students analyse their own and others performance and apply theoretical principles and plan programs to enhance performance. Physical activity and sport are used to develop skills and performance along with an understanding of physiological, anatomical, psychological, biomechanical and skill learning applications.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
The focus of this unit is to provide opportunities for students to build upon their acquired physical skills, and biomechanical, physiological and psychological understandings to improve their own and others’ physical activity. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: •adjust and refine movement skills in a variety of competitive situations;
•define transfer of learning and understand its effects;
•evaluate the different types of transfer and their impact on skill execution and movement efficiency;
•analyse movement skills of self and others, and design coaching/teaching programs to improve performance;
•define and relate the following biomechanical principles: momentum, impulse momentum, coefficient of restitution, levers, moment of inertia, and angular momentum;
•understand and describe the micro-structure of skeletal muscles and how they contract; •understand the relationship between muscle contraction and the amount of force exerted; •investigate the relationship between nutritional requirements and energy demands during physical activity;
•understand the implications of preparing and performing in different environmental conditions;
•explain the physiological impact of performance enhancers; and
•analyse mental skills strategies used during pre and post performance to manage stress, motivation, concentration, arousal levels, and self-confidence.

Unit 4
The focus of this unit is to extend understanding of complex biomechanical, psychological and physiological concepts to evaluate their own and others’ performance.

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:
•adapt and implement strategic responses, varying in complexity, to situational demands in dynamic and challenging environments;
•explain and apply fluid mechanics, such as spin, and Bernoulli’s principle and drag, in specific physical activities;
•apply biomechanical principles to analyse and evaluate specific skills;
•understand the role of the neuromuscular systems in relation to muscle function; •identify characteristics of fast and slow twitch fibres and their relationship to physical performance types;
•critically evaluate training programs designed to improve performance; and
•apply Carron’s model of group cohesion to analyse participation in physical activity.

The theoretical component of the course will account for 70% of the final grade. The content will be covered using the contexts of netball and touch, where students will participate in practical examinations during class time that will contribute to 30% of their grade.

Students selecting this course cannot select: Physical Education Studies General (ATPES).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

 

Physics

ATAR COURSE ATPHY

Prerequisites: Grade C or better in AEPHY.

The Physics ATAR course has three interrelated strands: Science Inquiry skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding, which build on students’ learning in the Years 7 to 10 Science curriculum. The three strands of this course are taught in an integrated way.

This course will provide a foundation for those students who wish to pursue tertiary study in science, engineering, medicine and technology.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. It is essential that students studying units 3 and 4 have completed units 1 and 2. Students are expected to know the content and skills from the Year 11 course.

Unit 3 – Gravity and electromagnetism
Students investigate models of motion in gravitational, electric and magnetic fields to explain how forces act at a distance.

Unit 4 – Revolutions in modern physics Students use the theory of electromagnetism to explain the production and propagation of electromagnetic waves and investigate how shortcomings in existing theories led to the development of the quantum theory of light and matter, the Special Theory of Relativity, and the Standard Model of particle physics.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Politics And Law

ATAR Course ATPAL

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEPAL or acceptance into ATENG or ATLIT.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Political and Legal power
This unit examines various aspects of the political and legal system established by the Commonwealth Constitution (Australia), including the roles and powers of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, with a comparison to a non Westminster system; the influence of individuals, political parties and pressure groups on the law making process of parliament and the courts; and the operation of federalism and the balance of power between the Commonwealth and the States in Australia.

Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit. An understanding of the Year 11 content is assumed knowledge for students in Year 12.

Unit 4 – Accountability and Rights
This unit examines the structures, processes and procedures of accountability in relation to the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government in Australia; how rights are protected, and democratic principles can be upheld and/or undermined, in Australia and one other country; and the experience of a particular group with respect to their political and legal rights in Australia.

Political and legal developments and contemporary issues (the last three years) are used to provide a framework for the unit. An understanding of the Year 11 content is assumed knowledge for students in Year 12.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Psychology

ATAR COURSE ATPSY

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEPSY.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
This unit focuses on the functions of the lobes of the cerebral cortex and examines how messages are transmitted from the brain to the body. It explores how behaviour is influenced by learning and other factors, and the impact of others on individual behaviour. Students examine socialisation processes observed within families and how social background and gender can shape communication styles. Students expand on their knowledge of ethics in psychological research as they engage in detailed investigations.

Unit 4
This unit focuses on developmental and contemporary personality theories and behaviours observed when individuals are examined in the social context. Students analyse the causes of conformity and obedience and gain an understanding of the factors that shape a sense of community. Students continue to develop their understanding and application of psychological research methods.

Students choosing this course cannot select: Psychology General (GTPSY).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Visual Arts (Gifted And Talented)

ATAR COURSE ATVARS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

The Visual Arts ATAR course encompasses the practice and theory of the broad areas of art, craft and design. Students have opportunities to express their imagination, develop personal imagery and skills and engage in the making and presentation of artwork. They develop aesthetic understandings and a critical awareness that assists them to appreciate and make informed evaluations of art.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Commentaries
The focus for this unit is commentaries. In this unit, students engage with the social and cultural purposes of art making to produce a unique and cohesive body of work. Broad and innovative inquiry includes the conceptualisation and documentation of experiences within contemporary society. Students transform ideas and develop concepts using innovative approaches to art making and presentation. They document their thinking and working practices, having the flexibility to work across media and art forms.

Unit 4 – Points of view
The focus for this unit is points of view. Students identify and explore concepts or issues of personal significance in the presentation of a sustained, articulate and authentic body of work. They engage in sustained inquiry, exploring ideas and developing concepts to communicate a personal point of view.

Students investigate a range of solutions using visual language and document the progressive resolution of thinking and working practices. Skills, techniques and processes are combined in the pursuit of new art forms, innovation and personal style.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as extension workshops.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

 

GENERAL

Applied Information Technology

General Course GTAIT

Prerequisites: Nil

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two parts which are delivered as a pair.

The development and application of digital
technologies impact most aspects of living and working in our society. Digital technologies have changed how people interact and exchange information. These developments have created new challenges and opportunities in lifestyle, entertainment, education and commerce.

Throughout the Applied Information Technology General course, students investigate client driven issues and challenges, devise solutions, produce models or prototypes and then evaluate and refin the design solution in collaboration with the client. Students are provided with the opportunity to experience, albeit in a school environment, developing digital solutions for real situations.

The practical application of skills, techniques and strategies to solve information problems is a key focus of the course. Students also gain an understanding of computer systems and networks. In undertaking projects and designing solutions, the legal, ethical and social issues associated with each solution are also considered and evaluated.

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills of digital technologies. It also encourages students to use digital technologies in a responsible and informed manner. The Applied Information Technology General course provides a sound theoretical and practical foundation, offering pathways to further studies and a wide range of technology based careers

Students selecting this course cannot select ATAIT.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Design: Dimensional

General Course GEDESD

Prerequisites: Nil

All objects within the built world, from architecture, to clothing, to furniture, and everything in between has been designed with some purpose in mind.

Designers employ a wide range of principles, methods and techniques drawn from a variety of different disciplines such as psychology, communication, technical graphics, engineering, architecture, sociology, cultural studies, marketing and economics. Application of these skills results in products that are engaging, useful, and sustainable.

We live in a world that exposes us to a constant barrage of design communication. Sometimes the intention of design is to inform, educate or entertain. Often the intention is also to influence or persuade. An understanding of design and how it works enhances an individual’s ability to interact with their environment, learn from it, and grow within it. It also empowers the individual by making them more discerning of, and therefore less susceptible to, manipulation and influence via design.

The Dimensional Design course will examine how and why products are designed and provide students the opportunity to design, prototype and build their own physical, three-dimensional products to suit an identified need. Students will work with a range of materials and construction techniques, and will learn how to iterate designs through rapid prototyping, sketching, and Computer Aided Design skills.

This course also emphasises the scope of design in professional and trade based industries allowing students to maximise vocational and/or university pathways.

Students choosing this course cannot select:

  • Design: Photography General (GTDESP) or;
  • Design: Photography ATAR (ATDESP)

 

Design: Photography

General Course GTDESD

Prerequisites: Nil

In Year 12 students will study product and cultural design. Students learn that the commercial world is comprised of companies, requiring consumer products, services and brands for a particular audience. They will be introduced to the concept of intellectual property. Using the design process, they create products/services, visuals and/ or layouts with an awareness of codes and conventions.

In exploring cultural design students investigate that society is made up of different groups of people who share diverse values, attitudes, beliefs, behaviours and needs; and different forms of visual communication transmit these values and beliefs. Students are encouraged to create designs that link to a culture or sub-culture and are introduced to ethical issues concerning representation. Students develop a design process with an understanding of codes and conventions. Student creativity and skills will be developed through traditional and digital platforms, The Design context includes Photography, Illustration and Graphics.

Creative projects can include festival posters; music festival/ band promotional material; harmony day; portrait, formal portrait photography; social/cultural
documentary; community/social photographic studies; Fashion campaign poster; self-image; family portrait album; stereotype; montage photography: portrait photography; documentary, skateboard/surfboard designs; logo/ advertising: design for non-profit organisation or sub-culture; sustainable design concepts, for example, green café, canvas shoe design and promotional poster: program design for event or function; advertisement for a particular sub-culture; horoscope symbols for a specific magazine such as Frankie; theme or issue inspired book/magazine/comic book covers; illustrated cover and pages for a teen novel/genre; game cover and promotional T-shirt; or greetings cards with cultural context, for example, birthday, sympathy.

 

Students choosing this course cannot select DESIGN: PHOTOGRAPHY ATAR (ATDESP).

This course counts towards a students WACE but not ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Drama (Gifted And Talented)

General Course GTDRAS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only. Students must see Director of Drama.

The Drama General course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes such as improvisation, play building, text interpretation, playwriting for children theatre and dramaturgy which allows them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts written or devised by others.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Representational, realist drama
This unit focuses on representational, realistic drama. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and others.

Unit 4 – Presentational, non-realist drama
This unit focuses on presentational, non-realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and others.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

 

English

General Course GTENG

Prerequisites: Nil.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
Unit 3 focuses on exploring different perspectives presented in a range of texts and contexts. Students:
explore attitudes, text structures and language features to understand a text’s meaning and purpose
examine relationships between context, purpose and audience in different language modes and types of texts, and their impact on meaning
consider how perspectives and values are presented in texts to influence specific audiences
develop and justify their own interpretations when responding to texts
learn how to communicate logically, persuasively and imaginatively in different contexts, for different purposes, using a variety of types of texts.

Unit 4
Unit 4 focuses on community, local or global issues and ideas presented in texts and on developing students’ reasoned responses to them. Students:
explore how ideas, attitudes and values are presented by synthesising information from a range of sources to develop independent perspectives
analyse the ways in which authors influence and position audiences investigate differing perspectives and develop reasoned responses to these in a range of text forms for a variety of audiences
construct and clearly express coherent, logical and sustained arguments and demonstrate an understanding of purpose, audience and context
consider intended purpose and audience
response when creating their own persuasive, analytical, imaginative, and interpretive texts.

Students choosing this course cannot select: English ATAR (ATENG).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task

Food Science And Technology

General Course GTFST

Prerequisites: Nil.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two parts which are delivered as a pair.
Food impacts every aspect of daily life and is essential for maintaining overall health and wellbeing. The application of science and technology plays an important role in understanding how the properties of food are used to meet the needs of consumers and producers. Food laws and regulations govern the production, supply and distribution of safe foods. Students develop practical food-related skills, understandings and attitudes that enhance their problem solving abilities and decision-making skills.

In the Food Science and Technology General course, students develop their interests and skills through the design, production and management of food-related tasks. They extend their knowledge of the sensory, physical, chemical and functional properties of food and apply these in practical situations. Students explore innovations in science and technology and changing consumer demands. New and emerging foods encourage the design, development and marketing of a range of products, services and systems.

Students with special dietary needs/allergies must consult with the Home Economics Assistant Director, Damian Cochrane.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Health Studies

General Course GTHEA

Prerequisites: Nil.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
This unit focuses on building students’ knowledge and understandings of health determinants and their interaction and contribution to personal and community health. Students define and consolidate understandings of health promotion and are introduced to key health literacy skills. Students expand on their understanding of the impact of beliefs on health behaviour and continue to develop personal and interpersonal skills which support health. Inquiry skills are consolidated and applied, including the ability to identify trends and patterns in data.

Unit 4
This unit focuses on the impact of health determinants on personal and community health. The concept of community development and the importance of participation and empowerment is introduced. The use of social marketing in health is explored and students are introduced to emotional intelligence as a mechanism for perceiving, controlling and evaluating emotions.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Human Biology

General Course GTHBY 
Prerequisites: Nil
Desirable: C grade in year 10 science
The Year 12 Human Biology General course explores how various human body systems work together to maintain a constant internal environment and respond to invading pathogens.  It also explores variation between humans through the study of inheritance, including how gene pools are influenced by evolutionary mechanisms, and evolutionary trends in hominins.
This course is relevant to all students, preparing them to be responsible, informed citizens in society, whilst also being valuable for a wide variety of career paths.
The year 12 syllabus is divided into two units:
Unit 3 
This unit explores the nervous and endocrine systems and the mechanisms that help maintain the systems of the body to function within normal ranges, including maintenance of body temperature, body fluid composition, blood sugar and gas concentrations.  It also explores how pathogens are transmitted, and the human body’s defence mechanisms.  Students investigate how modern biotechnology is used to produce synthetic hormones and vaccines and contributes to many treatments of disease.
Unit 4 
This unit explores inheritance and how variation in human gene pools occurs.  Evolutionary mechanisms, scientific models and molecular genetic technologies are investigated, providing evidence for evolutionary relationships.  Trends in human evolution are identified as the result of environmental changes on earth over time.
Students choosing this subject cannot select:
Human Biology ATAR

Integrated Science

General Course GTISC

Prerequisites: Nil.

The Integrated Science General course has three interrelated strands: Science Inquiry Skills, Science as a Human Endeavour and Science Understanding, which build on students’ learning in the Year 7–10
Science curriculum. The three strands of science will be taught in an integrated way. The course is inclusive and aims to be attractive to students with a wide variety of backgrounds, interests and career aspirations. It is a course grounded in the belief that science is, in essence, a practical activity. The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The content within Unit 3 and Unit 4 can be taught in an integrated way in one or more contexts over the year.

Unit 3 – Biological and Earth System
The emphasis of this unit is on biological and Earth systems, focusing on the following topics:
Interrelationships between Earth systems
Structure and function of biological systems
Ecosystems and sustainability
Species continuity and change.

Unit 2
The emphasis of this unit is on physical and chemical systems, focusing on the

  • following topics:
  • chemical reactions
  • mixtures and solutions
  • motion and forces
  • energy.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Materials, Design And Technology: Textiles

Materials, Design And Technology

General Course GTMDTT

Prerequisites: Nil.

Working with materials, student develop a range of manipulation, processing, manufacturing and organisational skills. When designing with materials, they develop cognitive skills, such as solving problems, generating ideas, creating design strategies and communicating what they do. This makes them more technologically literate, and as consumers, enables them to make more informed decisions about the use and misuse of technology.

Students develop an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in the design, production and use of their projects. Students learn about manufacturing and production skills and techniques. They develop the skills and techniques appropriate to the materials being used and gain practice in planning and managing processes through the production of design projects.

Students learn about the nature of designing for a client, target audience or market. Students apply an understanding of the elements and fundamentals of design and consider human factors involved in their design projects. Students learn about the nature, properties and environmental impacts related to a variety of materials and production techniques. They develop creative thinking strategies, work on design projects within specified constraints and consider the environmental impacts of recycling of materials. Students extend their understanding of safe working practices and contemporary manufacturing techniques and develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required to manage the processes of designing and manufacturing.

Students are given a specific design task for each unit. They will design a product that will make use of recycled garments and a personal item they will design for their own use. This course may lead to further training at institutions including the Western Academy of Performing Arts (costuming) or TAFE (fashion courses, fashion journalism) and employment opportunities in areas that include textiles and clothing manufacturing and design.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Mathematics: Essentials

General Course GTMAE

Prerequisites: At least 55% in GEMAE or teacher recommendation.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3
This unit provides students with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems related to measurement, scales, plans and models, drawing and interpreting graphs and data collection. Students use the mathematical thinking process and apply the statistical investigation process. Teachers are encouraged to apply the content of the four topics in this unit: measurement; scales, plans and models; graphs in practical situations; and data collection, in a context which is meaningful and of interest to the students. Possible contexts for this unit are construction and design, and medicine. It is assumed that an extensive range of technological applications and techniques will be used in teaching this unit. The ability to choose when, and when not, to use some form of technology, and the ability to work flexibly with technology, are important skills. The number formats for the unit are positive and negative numbers, decimals, fractions, percentages, rates, ratios, square and cubic numbers written with powers and square roots.

Unit 4
This unit provides students with the mathematical skills and understanding to solve problems related to probability, earth geometry and time zones, loans and compound interest. Students use the mathematical thinking process and apply the statistical investigation process to solve problems involving probability. Teachers are advised to apply the content of the three topics in this unit: probability and relative frequencies; earth geometry and time zones; and loans and compound interest, in a context which is meaningful and of interest to the students. Possible contexts for this unit are finance and travel. It is assumed that an extensive range of technological applications and techniques will be used in teaching this unit. The ability to choose when, and when not, to use some form of technology, and the ability to work flexibly with technology, are important skills. The number formats for the unit are positive and negative numbers, decimals, fractions, percentages, rates, ratios and numbers expressed with integer powers.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

Music: Contemporary

ATAR Course ATMUSC

Prerequisites: Successful achievement in AEMUSC.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Across the two units, students extend and apply their skills, knowledge and understanding of music to create, communicate and evaluate music ideas with increasing depth and complexity. They continue to develop and consolidate aural and music literacy skills, learning how the elements of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when listening, performing, composing and analysing music.

Students explore how social, cultural and historical factors shape music, developing an understanding of music conventions and practices in the specific context (selected for study. They apply critical listening and thinking skills and develop aesthetic understanding through comparing and analysing musical works.

Students are encouraged to reach their creative and expressive potential, developing skills and stylistic awareness to confidently engage in music making as performers and audience members, both individually and collaboratively.

Contemporary Music encompasses popular music from the 1950s to the present day. It is predominantly commercial in nature and is constantly evolving through the influence of youth culture and the emergence of new artists and styles.

Students are required to participate in a minimum of one ensemble.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
Music Western Art (ATMUSW)

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination

Music: Contemporary (Gifted And Talented)

ATAR Course ATMUSCS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Across the two units, students extend and apply their skills, knowledge and understanding of music to create, communicate and evaluate music ideas with increasing depth and complexity. They continue to develop and consolidate aural and music literacy skills, learning how the elements of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when listening, performing, composing and analysing music.

Students explore how social, cultural and historical factors shape music, developing an understanding of music conventions and practices in the specific context (selected for study. They apply critical listening and thinking skills and develop aesthetic understanding through comparing and analysing musical works.

Students are encouraged to reach their creative and expressive potential, developing skills and stylistic awareness to confidently engage in music making as performers and audience members, both individually and collaboratively.

Contemporary Music encompasses popular music from the 1950s to the present day. It is predominantly commercial in nature and is constantly evolving through the influence of youth culture and the emergence of new artists and styles.

Students are required to participate in a minimum of one ensemble,

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
Music Western Art (ATMUSWS)

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Music: Music Theatre (Gifted And Talented)

ATAR Course ATMUSCT

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

This course will be delivered in the context of Contemporary Music which encompasses popular music from the 1950s to the present day. It is predominantly commercial in nature and is constantly evolving through the influence of youth culture and the emergence of new artists and styles.

Students extend and apply their skills, knowledge and understanding of music to create, communicate and evaluate music ideas with increasing depth and complexity. They continue to develop and consolidate aural and music literacy skills, learning how the elements of music can be applied, combined and manipulated when listening, performing, composing and analysing music.

Students explore how social, cultural and historical factors shape music, developing an understanding of music conventions and practices in the context of Contemporary Music. They apply critical listening and thinking skills and develop aesthetic understanding through comparing and analysing musical works.

Students are encouraged to reach their creative and expressive potential, developing skills and stylistic awareness to confidently engage in music making as performers and audience members, both individually and collaboratively. Rehearsal attendance is a compulsory requirement for students accessing IMSS lesson.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and exhibitions.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
Music Western Art (ATMUSWS)

This course counts towards a student’s WACE and ATAR. There is a COMPULSORY external examination.

Outdoor Education

General Course GTOED

Prerequisites: Competent and confident open water swimmers.

Outdoor Education aims to develop an understanding of students relationship with the environment, their peers and themselves. This course focuses on a preparation and participation in a range of experiences including challenging land based and/or water based activities.

It provides students with an opportunity to develop essential outdoor skills and life skills such as communication, leadership and self management, whilst building a comprehensive understanding of the role they play in the environment. Students will be required to participate in a range of short duration excursions/expeditions in selected outdoor activities. They are encouraged to step outside of their comfort zone and embrace an array of different opportunities.

Philosophy And Ethics

GENERAL Course GTPAE

Prerequisites: Nil.

The Philosophy and Ethics General Course develops thinking skills and moral reasoning that students apply to a range of practical situations in their personal, social and working lives. The study of Philosophy gives students a set of skills that better enable them to understand, evaluate and engage with their internal and external world and community. Employers are increasingly searching for people who can analyse new situations and devise and evaluate appropriate strategies to manage them.

Philosophical thought shapes what people think, what they value, and what they consider to be true. Philosophy is a practical activity. We ‘do’ Philosophy, for example, when we seek to define something, when we challenge assumptions, when we construct an argument, and when we think about what we are doing and why.

Philosophical inquiry requires that we question our assumptions, beliefs and our reasons for holding them. The Philosophy and Ethics General course aims to empower students to make independent judgments on the basis of reason.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
Philosophy and Ethics ATAR (ATPAE)

In Year 12, this course leads onto GTPAE.

Physical Education Studies

General Course GTPES

Prerequisites: Nil

The Physical Education Studies General course contributes to the development of the whole person. It promotes the physical, social and emotional growth of students. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on understanding and improving performance in physical activities. The integration of theory and practice is central to studies in this course. The weighting is 50% practical and 50% theory.

The Physical Education Studies General course focuses on the complex interrelationships between motor learning and psychological, biomechanical and physiological factors that influence individual and team performance. Students engage as performers, leaders, coaches, analysts and planners of physical activity. Physical activity is the source of content and data, and also as the medium for learning. Students closely integrate written, oral and physical learning experiences based on the study of selected physical activities.

Students analyse their performance and the performance of others, apply theoretical principals, and plan programs to enhance performance. Physical activity and sport are used to develop students’ skills and performance, and is combined with an understanding of physiological, anatomical, psychological, biomechanical and skill learning applications.

The course prepares students for a variety of postschool pathways, including immediate employment or tertiary studies. It provides students with an increasingly diverse range of employment opportunities in sports, leisure and recreation, education, sport development, youth work and health and medical fields linked to physical activity and sport. The course also equips students to take on volunteer and leadership roles in community activities.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:

  • Physical Education Studies ATAR (ATPES)

This course counts towards a students WACE but not ATAR. There is no COMPULSORY external examination. However there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

 

Psychology

GENERAL COURSE GTPSY

Prerequisites: Nil.

Psychology aims to answer important questions such as what motivates people and what factors influence their development. Psychological knowledge helps us understand factors relating to individuals such as the way we think, biological influences and personality. Psychological understandings can be applied broadly to many different areas of our lives. In this course students will gain psychological understandings about themselves and the world around them. Students will be involved in the exploration and analysis of data to illustrate how scientific research methods are used to examine different concepts within psychology.

General psychology explores the nature of human behaviour, thinking and relationships. It is extremely useful in gaining insight into how people operate as individuals, within group situations and as part of society as a whole. This course is ideal for students studying in a General course pathway; those who are heading into the workplace after school and those who want to develop skills in a discussion based, engaging and interesting class. The study of psychology is highly relevant to further studies in health professions, education, human resources, social sciences, sales, media and marketing, and aims to provide a better understanding of human behaviour and the means to enhance quality of life.

Student choosing this course cannot select: Psychology ATAR (ATPSY).

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no COMPULSORY external examination . However there is a COMPULSORY externally Set task.

Visual Arts (Gifted And Talented)

GENERAL COURSE GTVAR

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

The Visual Arts General course encompasses the practice and theory of the broad areas of art, craft and design. Students have opportunities to express their imagination and develop personal imagery, skills and engage in the making and presentation of artworks. They develop aesthetic understandings and a critical awareness that assists them to appreciate and make informed evaluations of art.

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair.

Unit 3 – Inspirations
The focus for this unit is inspirations. Students become aware that artists gain inspiration and generate ideas from diverse sources, including what is experienced, learned about, believed in, valued, imagined or invented. The breadth of this focus allows choice of learning contexts that are related to students’ interests.

In this unit, students develop their knowledge and understanding of visual language and apply this to both art making and art interpretation. Through exploration, investigation and experimentation, they develop skills in inquiry, recording observations and manipulating media to create artworks in selected art forms.

Unit 4 – Investigations
The focus for this unit is investigations. Students explore and develop ideas through the investigation of different artists, art forms, processes and technologies. Students investigate spontaneous and analytical styles of drawing, experimenting with a range of media and techniques. They further develop their knowledge and understanding of visual language and apply this to both art making and art interpretation.

In particular, students explore the expressive potential of media techniques and processes, considering their inherent qualities in the development and presentation of their artworks. They investigate ways to document their thinking and working practices, refining their reflection and decision-making skills.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as extension workshops.

This course counts towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is NO COMPULSORY external examination. However, there is a COMPULSORY externally set task.

VET

Dance

CUA20120 Certificate II in Dance

VET Course CTDAN

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Dance units of competencies.

This is the second year of a two year course. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete a Certificate II in Dance. This course will cater for students who wish to pursue a practical and performance based course. Students will explore different dance styles such as:

  • contemporary dance;
  • jazz dance;
  • tap dance; and
  • urban dance.

Students will also develop fitness, improvisation and dance composition skills, working with industry professionals and expert college staff. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in six performances across the two years of the certificate course.

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Upon completion of the course Year 12, students will be issued with AQF Certification from JCCA RTO50549.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Dance (Ballet)

CUA30920 Certificate III in Dance (Gifted and Talented)

VET Course CTBALS

Prerequisites: This course is available only for continuing GAT ballet students. It’s recommended students also enrol in the ATAR Dance Gifted and Talented course.

The Year 12 Gifted and Talented Ballet Program is designed to provide students with the necessary hours (15-20) of intensive training required to pursue dance/ballet as a career. This integrated program will be delivered during school curriculum time, in after school workshops and on Saturday mornings.

CUA30920 Certificate III in Dance is a rigorous course enabling students to experience dance from a pre-professional perspective. All students become part of the College Project Company, working and performing with industry professionals and highly expert teachers.

This program aims to provide the student with an environment which reflect industry standards and expectations.

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over three years commencing in Year 10 and completing in Year 12. This course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Students selecting this course cannot select CUA30920 Certificate III in Dance- Contemporary.

Upon completion of the course Year 12, students will be issued with AQF Certification from JCCA RTO50549.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Dance (Gifted and Talented)

CUA20120 Certificate II in Dance

VET Course CTDANS

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Dance units of competencies.

This is the second year of a two year course. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete a Certificate II in Dance. This course will cater for students who wish to pursue a practical and performance based course. Students will explore different dance styles such as:

  • contemporary dance;
  • jazz dance;
  • tap dance; and
  • urban dance.

Students will also develop fitness, improvisation and dance composition skills, working with industry professionals and expert college staff. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in six performances across the two years of the certificate course.

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as costumes, external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Design

CUA20720 Certificate II in Visual Arts

VET Course CTDESTG

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Design units of competence.

This is the second year of a two year course. Students studying this course will be able to complete the nationally accredited certificate course.
This course also provides training in project management, the scientific method and the engineering design process. Students enrolled in the CUA20720 Certificate II in Visual Arts qualification are able to pursue their interests and potential career directions by personally investing in the course through freedom of choice. This course is tailored to meet the needs of every student and creates direct links to University and TAFE courses by either direct contact with Industry representatives or portfolio entrance to a variety of tertiary options.

Upon completion of the course Year 12, students will be issued with AQF Certification from JCCA RTO50549.

This certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not ATAR. There is no compulsory examination or externally set task for this course.

Football Specialist

SIS20115 Certificate II in Sport and Recreation

VET Course CTFBLS

Prerequisites: By selection only.
This is the second year of a two year course

The Football Specialist course is an Approved Specialist Sports Program and is conducted from Years 7 to 12 at the College. Students are provided with advanced coaching within the practical component of the course.

Students studying this course are able to complete the nationally accredited certificate course which offers the opportunity to take on leadership roles.

The practical elements of the course may include:

  • First Aid training;
  • refereeing qualification (Level 4);
  • assisting in preparing and conducting football sessions;
  • assisting with college and sporting carnivals;
  • understanding of the sport,fitness and recreation industry;
  • maintaining and providing equipment for sporting events; and
  • awareness and understanding of workplace health and safety.

The course is designed to develop fully rounded and informed football players who are able to work and participate in football in the community as well as continue to develop as individual and team players. Students will require their own device as assessment tasks are completed online.

This certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory examination or externally set task for this course.

This qualification is delivered in partnership with IVET Institute (RTO 40548) and the certificate will be issued by IVET at the completion of Year 12.

Students selecting this course cannot select:
SIS20115 Certificate II in Sport and Recreation

Please note that if payment of the annual charges have not been made in full and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as bus transport, external guest tutors or interschool fixtures.

 

Front Of House

CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative Industries

VET COURSE CTFOH

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Front of House units of competencies.
NB: This course runs after college hours

Students in Year 12 who have already completed units of competency toward the achievement of CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative Industries (Front of House), will have the opportunity to complete the
remaining units. To complete the practical component of this nationally accredited certificate course students continue to participate and mentor in Front of House duties completing their minimum required
hours. The theory component of the course is delivered outside of school hours, through workshops, meetings and self directed work at home.

This certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Media

CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative Industries

VET Course CTMEDIA

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Media units of competencies.

Students continue working on units of competency towards the completion of the qualification.

  • Students will participate in:
  • digital video editing;
  • scriptwriting;
  • directing;
  • sound recording and audio editing;
  • online cross promotions;
  • lighting;
  • filming productions;
  • Adobe premiere to digital editing; and
  • Adobe Photoshop.

Students studying this course will have the opportunity to use industry standard software including Premiere, Photoshop and After Effects. Students are required to participate in Media camps, weekend workshops, industry excursions and incursions.

Many of the learning experiences in the media course are student-centred to encourage students to take responsibility for their learning and work at their own pace.

As Media, Production and Front of House now come under the same certificate qualification students who would like to do more than one context must consult with Ms Coverley (Associate Principal).

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a students WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and exhibitions.

Media (Gifted and Talented)

CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative Industries

VET COURSE CTMEDIS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

This practical media course is recommended for students in Year 12 who are interested in the Film and TV industry and the knowledge to operate in a changing digital media world.

  • Students will participate in:
  • digital video editing;
  • scriptwriting;
  • directing;
  • sound recording and audio editing;
  • online cross promotions;
  • lighting;
  • filming productions;
  • Adobe premiere to digital editing; and
  • Adobe Photoshop.

Students studying this course will have the opportunity to use industry standard software including Premiere, Photoshop and After Effects. Students are required to participate in Media camps, weekend workshops, industry excursions and incursions.

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a students WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first exhibition and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and exhibitions.

Music

CUA30920 Certificate III in Music

VET Course CTMUS

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 units of competence.

Students work independently and in groups to develop their skills and knowledge in aspects of the music industry. The majority of learning is based on practical activities with music industry performances as the focus.

Students who completed the Enrichment Music course in lower school are provided with a continuation of their instrumental/ voice tuition through the IMSS program, 20 minutes per week throughout Years 11 and 12.

Ensemble attendance is a compulsory requirement for all Certificate III music students. Students are required to participate in a minimum of one ensemble.
Students will be expected to perform at college events and to the wider community. Students will the opportunity to experience:

  • WAAPA tours;
  • attending recording studios;
  • solo and group performances;
  • participating in industry gigs;

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task in this course.

Upon completion of the CUA30920 Certificate III in Music, students will receive certification from COSAMP (RTO 41549).

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Music (Gifted and Talented)

CUA30920 Certificate III in Music

VET Course CTMUSS

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.

Students work independently and in groups to develop their skills and knowledge in aspects of the music industry. The majority of learning is based on practical activities with music industry performances as the focus.

Students who completed the GAT Music course in lower school are provided with a continuation of their instrumental/voice tuition through the IMSS program, 20 minutes per week throughout Years 11 and 12.

Ensemble attendance is a compulsory requirement for all Certificate III music students. Students are required to participate in a minimum of two ensembles. Students will be expected to perform at college events and to the wider community. Students will have the opportunity to experience:

  • WAAPA tours;
  • attending recording studios;
  • solo and group performances;
  • participating in industry gigs;

This certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task in this course.

Upon completion of the CUA30920 Certificate III in Music, students will receive certification from COSAMP (RTO 41549).

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
CUA20620 Certificate II in Music- Music Theatre.

Music: Music Theatre (Gifted And Talented)

CUA30920 Certificate III in Music

VET COURSE CTMUSMT

Prerequisites: Through GAT testing only.
Completion of Year 11 units of competence.

Students continue to work independently and in groups to develop their skills and knowledge in aspects of the music industry. The majority of learning is based on practical activities with music theatre performances as the focus.

Students will also complete research tasks based on the history of music theatre, relevant theatre terminology and significant musicals and performers. This research will broaden their understanding of music theatre and bring new dimensions to their performances.

Students continue completing units of study in gaining creative arts industry knowledge, working effectively with others, developing skills to play or sing music and developing and applying musical ideas and listening skills within the Music Industry. Students continue with their voice tuition through the IMSS program, 20 minutes per week throughout Year 12. Rehearsal attendance is a compulsory requirement for students accessing IMSS lessons.

This certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Upon completion of the CUA30920 Certificate III in Music, students will receive certification from COSAMP (RTO 41549).

Please note that if payment of the annual charges has not been made in full prior to the first performance and there is no payment plan in place, the student may not be able to access some resources such as external guest tutors, extension workshops and performances.

Students choosing this subject cannot select:
CUA30920 Certificate III in Music

Production

CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative Industries

VET COURSE CTPROD

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Production units of competence.

Students in Year 12 have the opportunity to continue to complete units of competency towards the achievement of a CUA20220 Certificate II in Creative industries: Production context. This provides students with foundational skills in a broad range of technical theatre applications. Students design sound and lighting installations, set up and mix live music, assist during live productions, learn basic staging skills, and work with a range of hand and power tools used to construct scenery and properties.

Students further enhance their talent and abilities required by the technical theatre industry through the creation of their own original live production. Students operate both independently and in groups to create a dynamic and compelling work based around a common theme. Past works have included Son et Lumiere installations where students communicate to the audience through the cleaver use of sound and light.

The certificate course is designed to be delivered over two years in upper school and students upon completion will be issued with AQF Certification.

This certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory external examination or externally set task for this course.

Sport And Recreation

SIS20115 Certificate II in Sport and
Recreation

VET Course CTSPORT

Prerequisites: Completion of Year 11 Sport and Recreation units of competence.

Students studying this course will be able to complete the nationally accredited certificate course which offers students the opportunity to take on leadership roles and actively participate in multiple sporting areas throughout the course.

The course includes theoretical and practical tasks including areas such as:

  • organise and complete daily work activities;
  • facilitate groups;
  • assisting and developing activity sessions; and
  • acquiring an understanding of working effectively in sport, fitness and recreation industries.

Various sports are used as practical sessions to support the above. Students will have the opportunity to coach peers and lower school students in various sporting areas, assist with the organisation and running of College carnivals.

Students will require a physical education uniform as prescribed by the college. Students will require their own devices as assessment task are completed online.

The certificate course is recognised by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority as helping to complete requirements towards a student’s WACE but not an ATAR. There is no compulsory examination or externally set task for this course.

This qualification is delivered in partnership with IVET Institute (RTO 40548) and the certificate will be issued by IVET at the completion of Year 12.

Students selecting this subject cannot select:
Football Specialist- SIS20115 Certificate II in Sport and Recreation.

Contribution and Charges

Fees from contributions and charges are based on the expenses of executing the curriculum associated with that course, such as involving specialist tutors for certain instruments, and failure to pay contributions and charges may have an impact on a child’s ability to participate in their course

To view course charges and information regarding Contribution and Charges for your child, please see our Contribution and Charges page on our website or alternatively, click the link below: